Shunji Salmon Birthdays

When my wife and I were trying to decide where to celebrate our birthdays last month, it wasn’t really a matter of choosing a spot.  We both pretty much had the same place in mind:  Shunji!  We wanted a special meal, befitting a birthday celebration (or two), but money’s been tight lately.  We couldn’t splurge on anything too decadent, like the infamous truffle gohan that even Shunji himself is reluctant to serve because of its cost.

Instead, I worked with Yuko to arranged a meal centered around my wife’s favorite fish:  salmon.  To keep costs manageable, we went mid-day to take advantage of their lunch deals, but I also asked if Shunji would prepare one or two non-sushi courses showcasing the theme ingredient.  What we ended up with was a very reasonable, yet quite special, birthday lunch.

Salmon Sashimi Salad with Caviar:  Shunji said this was a dish from his Asanebo days.  Inside the orange-hued globe, composed of at least 7 or 8 “petals” of salmon belly, was a salad of onion, cucumber, and daikon radish.  Resting on a pool of ponzu, and topped with a dollop of caviar on a diminutive “plate” of cucumber, this dish was too gorgeous to eat.  Almost.  And it tasted as good as it looked.

Salmon Sashimi Salad with Caviar

Salmon Sashimi Salad with Caviar

Sake Saikyo Yaki with Yamamomo:  The singular kitchen dish, this was a simple preparation of grilled miso-marinated salmon, served along side a mountain peach.  The fish was fatty, melt-in-mouth tender, yet substantive, with just a bit of char along the edges.

Sake Saikyo Yaki w/Yamamomo

Sake Saikyo Yaki w/Yamamomo

Salmon, Salmon, More Salmon, and Sea Trout:  My wife had two pieces of each of these nigiri and was in heaven.  The marinated salmon was and still is one of her favorites, but it was great to have some variety.  I snuck a bite of each piece, and they were each distinctive and delicious.

Top: Marinated Sake/Salmon, Sake Toro/Belly. Bottom: Benizake/Sockeye, Masu/Sea Trout.

Top: Marinated Sake/Salmon, Sake Toro/Belly. Bottom: Benizake/Sockeye, Masu/Sea Trout.

Shiromi Flight:  My starting series of nigiri was a small variety of white-fleshed fish, or shiromi.  Shunji always has an assortment of these on his specials board, and though they’re not my favorite sushi fish (that’s next), they never fail to please with their lighter flavors and tender textures.

Top: Madai/Red Seabream, Kinmedai/Golden Eye. Bottom: Kodai/Baby Seabream, Medai/Blue Nose.

Top: Madai/Red Seabream, Kinmedai/Golden Eye. Bottom: Kodai/Baby Seabream, Medai/Blue Nose.

Hikarimono Flight:  Some of my favorite neta, sushi toppings, are shiny/silver-skinned fish, or hikarimono.  They are usually a little oilier and have a richer flavor than shiromi.  These were excellent as always.

Top: Shiokko/Baby Amberjack, Kamasu/Barracuda. Bottom: Hiramasa Toro/Yellowtail Amberjack Belly, Shimaaji/Striped Jack.

Top: Shiokko/Baby Amberjack, Kamasu/Barracuda. Bottom: Hiramasa Toro/Yellowtail Amberjack Belly, Shimaaji/Striped Jack.

More Hikarimoni, Uni Two Ways:  Aji, horse mackerel, though commonly translated as Spanish mackerel, is probably my favorite hikarimono.  Shunji’s aji is always top notch, with a fresh, ocean-y taste and slightly nutty and bitter after taste.  Sagoshi, or baby king mackerel, didn’t taste like the typical hikarimono, but more like albacore.  The “regular” uni, sea urchin, that Shunji serves is usually from Santa Barbara, and my wife opted to have a piece raw, while I tried it steamed.  Shunji also had bafun uni from Hokkaido that day, but we abstained as it was $15/piece.

Top: Aji/Horse Mackerel, Sagoshi/Baby King Mackerel. Bottom: Uni/Sea Urchin, Steamed & Raw.

Top: Aji/Horse Mackerel, Sagoshi/Baby King Mackerel. Bottom: Uni/Sea Urchin, Steamed & Raw.

Ikura, Salmon Roe:  Shunji doesn’t use typical shio or shoyu